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Click on one of the questions below to jump directly to the answer, or just scroll down to browse each question.

What denominations are the groups?
How many groups do you have?
What kinds of girls are in the groups?
What qualities should a group leader have?
Is there training for group leaders and supervisors?
What is included in the manual, Sourcebook for Leaders?
What on-going consultation does Rosh Hodesh provide?
How old should the girls in our group be?
Where do the girls meet?
How do I recruit girls?
How long do the girls’ groups last?
How do we introduce Rosh Hodesh to parents and their daughters?
What role do parents play?
Do you have a program for the boys?
How much does Rosh Hodesh cost?
How do we sign up?

What denominations are the groups?
Rosh Hodesh groups are operated by institutional partners and serve girls from the full spectrum of Jewish life, including all denominations (Orthodox, Reform, Reconstructionist, Conservative) and those which are unaffiliated.

How many groups do you have?
In 2010-2011 Rosh Hodesh institutional partners — mostly congregations and day schools of all denominations -- are operating 320 groups for girls across North America.

What kinds of girls are in the groups?
Girls in grades 6-12, from all denominations and unaffiliated, native-born and Russian immigrants, from all different kinds of neighborhoods and economic backgrounds, including a group of developmentally delayed adult women.

What qualities should a group leader have?
She should: A master’s degree in social work, Jewish or secular education, or counseling is a plus.

Is there training for group leaders and supervisors?
Yes, Rosh Hodesh provides a mandatory, two-day, in-depth training seminar that prepares group leaders and supervisors to:

What is included in the Sourcebooks for Leaders? The Sourcebooks were developed with the input of a National Advisory Committee and were written by Tamar Astorino, MEd, Barbra Berley-Mellits, MSW Merle Berman, Rabbi Paula Mack Drill, Rabbi Rachel Gartner, Jennifer Groen, MSW, Rabbi Toby Manewith, Lauren Pokras, Aleza Summit, and Rivkah Walton, MFA

What on-going consultation does Rosh Hodesh provide?

How old should the girls in our group be?
Rosh Hodesh is designed for girls in grades 6 – 12. Whatever age you select, it is best to have only one age-group of girls, and we highly recommend that no more than two grades be grouped together.

Rosh Hodesh is intended to be a multi-year experience. We recommend that you begin with grade 6. The girls typically will not be as busy with bat mitzvah preparations or parties as they will be in 7th grade and it will give the girls more time to bond. They’ll be more likely to continue in their group through and beyond their bat mitzvah year because they will already have made a commitment to and felt the pleasure of being in a Rosh Hodesh group of girls.

The next best choice is to start with 8th grade girls. If you can, tap into an existing group of post-bat mitzvah girls, such as a confirmation program. The program can also fill a void, providing a meaningful and engaging post-bat mitzvah Jewish connection for girls with no other alternative.

Where do the girls meet?
One option is to rotate the groups meetings among the girls’ homes. This affords an inviting, hospitable environment and fosters the girls’ sense of ownership and commitment to the group’s success.

Alternatively, your sponsoring institution may prefer to host the monthly gatherings in its facility. This model can provide consistency for and deepen the girls’ relationship to the host institution.

The monthly meeting space should be informal and intimate, yet large enough for the girls to sit in a circle. It must offer privacy and be a place where food and crafts will be welcome. Not everything must happen in the same room. You may gather initially in one setting and adjourn to another space for crafts or eating.

How do I recruit girls?
Plan a multi-pronged approach to letting potential participants and their parents know about the program. Your objective should be to create wide name recognition for the program, create a "buzz" in the community, and stimulate interested girls to find out more, or at least to be receptive when your individualized letter arrives. You can publicize Rosh Hodesh through:

How long do the girls’ groups last?
Our vision is that girls remain in their groups throughout their middle and high school years. We started the first groups in school year 2000-2001, and two of those four groups met for a minimum of five years!

As the group continues to meet over the years, in most cases the core of the group will remain constant, although over time, some girls will leave and new girls will join.

In some situations, such as groups operated by middle schools, where girls graduate after 7th or 8th grade, the lifetime of the group is limited. The girls still are able to gain a great deal from their group!

We envision the girls building together in each group for each girl over their time together a strong Jewish identity and sense of self.

How do we introduce Rosh Hodesh to parents and their daughters?
Rosh Hodesh will provide material to help you conduct an introductory meeting to enable girls and their parents to experience a Rosh Hodesh gathering and learn about the program. This is one of the most effective ways of obtaining a commitment from girls and their parents.

What role do parents play?
Parents are essential to the group’s success, including in many cases ensuring that their daughters attend the monthly meetings. Follow-up communication by the group leader is critical to confirm dates, location of meetings, and directions.

Parents appreciate being informed about the nature and intent of the monthly gatherings and the expectations for their involvement.

If your group meets in homes, the girls will need parents to ensure privacy and provide appropriate spaces for food, candle lighting and craft projects.

Whether you meet in homes or an institution, we strongly recommend that the group leader speak with each parent soon after their daughter has committed to join the group to answer questions and address concerns. It will also enable the leader to ask the all-important question, "Is there anything I should know about your daughter?" so that she can be made aware of allergies, kashrut, and any other religious, health, or social issues.

Do you have a program for the boys?
Moving Traditions is launching The Brotherhood, a new program to help the Jewish community better meet the needs of adolescent boys and inspire their participation in Jewish life. Visit the Moving Traditions website for more information.

How much does Rosh Hodesh cost?
Click here to find out.

How do we sign up?
To start this program in your community, contact Jennifer Groen, Moving Traditions' Director of Education and Program at (215) 887-4511 x103 or jgroen@movingtraditions.org.

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